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The Florida Department of Health works to protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county, & community efforts.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Family Planning and Prenatal Health

  •  407-858-1487
  •  

    Fax

    407-836-2527
  •  

    Mailing Address

    6101 Lake Ellenor Drive 

    Orlando, FL 32809 

     

Family Planning and Prenatal Health
407-858-1487  
Fax 407-836-2527
   
Mailing Address
Family Planning and Prenatal Health
6101 Lake Ellenor Drive
Orlando, FL 32809

Birth Control Pills

Can I get birth control without my parents knowing?

  • Teenagers who are served at a Federally-funded family planning office, such as the Florida Department of Health in Orange County, do not need their parents’ permission to get birth control. It is recommended for teens to talk with their parents or another trusted adult about their thoughts about birth control and about becoming sexually active.

How long does it take for the pill to work?

  • The pill is effective two weeks after you start using it. As long as you remember to take the pill at the same time each day you will be protected from pregnancy.


Is it true that you can use the pill to skip your period?

  • Yes, it is possible to skip your period by using the pill. You should discuss this with your health care provider in order to understand what this might mean for your body.

Do antibiotics and other medications affect the pill?

  • Certain antibiotics and medications can have an effect on the pill and reduce its ability to prevent pregnancy. Please check with your doctor. It is advisable to use a backup method of birth control like male or female condoms or abstain from vaginal sex for up to a week after taking antibiotics.


If I become pregnant while on the pill will it harm the baby?

  • Studies have shown that the pill does not cause fetal abnormalities if taken during pregnancy. Of course, you should stop taking the pill as soon as possible when you find out you are pregnant

Depo-Provera Injection


How long does it take for Depo-Provera to work?

  • The Depo-Provera shot is effective about 24 hours after it is given (within the first five days of your menses); even if it is the first time you are getting the shot.


How often do I have to get the shot?

You have to get the shot once every three months to remain effective.


What if I am late for my shot?

  • If you are more than one week late you need to use a backup method, such as condoms. Schedule a visit with your doctor as soon as possible. Continue using your backup method up to one week after getting your shot.

 Can I breast feed my baby if I use Depo-Provera for birth control?

  • Yes, progestin only methods are preferred if a hormonal method of birth control is used during breastfeeding.

Emergency Contraceptives

What are Emergency Contraceptives?

  • They are special doses of birth control pills that can contain estrogen and progestin or only progestin.


Is this the same as the abortion pill?

  • No, emergency contraception pills are special birth control pills that prevent pregnancy. They will not work if you are already pregnant.


How do Emergency Contraceptives work?

  • Emergency contraception most likely works by preventing or delaying the release of an egg from a woman's ovaries.


When should I use Emergency Contraceptives?

  • It should be taken as soon as possible after having unprotected sex. This includes forgetting your birth control, your birth control method failed, or you had sex against your will.


Can Emergency Contraception Pills (ECP) protect me against Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI)?

  • No, they do not protect you against HIV or any other Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD).

Where can I get Emergency Contraceptives?

  • We offer Emergency Contraception.  It is available without a prescription at local pharmacies.

Pregnancy Testing

How long after sex must I wait to take a pregnancy test so that I get accurate results?

  • It is best to wait until you have missed a period by 10 to 14 days or two weeks to give your body time to build up the hormone HCG, which is only present when you are pregnant.


Can I walk in and get a pregnancy test?

  • Yes, testing is available to walk-in clients or appointments.


Can I get results the same day?

  • Yes, results are available the same day.


I'm under 18 do I need parental consent?

  • No, under Florida law you do not need parental consent to be seen or treated.


How much does it cost?

  • Cost is $6.50 but is covered by Medicaid for those who are eligible. Services to most minors are FREE.


What kind of pregnancy test do you offer?

  • We offer a urine based test that measures the amount of HCG, the pregnancy hormone, in your body.


I'm pregnant, now what?

  • You will be referred to eligibility who can help you apply for Medicaid as well as offer you information on other services available to you and your baby from the Department of Health.

What is Long Acting Reversible Contraception?

Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) are methods of birth control that provide effective contraception for an extended period without requiring user action. They include injections, intrauterine devices (IUDs) and subdermal contraceptive implants. They are the most effective reversible methods of contraception because they do not depend on patient compliance. So their 'typical use' failure rates, at less than 1% per year, are about the same as 'perfect use' failure rates. In addition to being long-lasting, convenient, and well-liked by users, they are very cost effective.

Long-acting reversible contraception is recommended for adolescentsto help decrease the teen pregnancy rate. LARCs are recommended for women of any age no matter how many times they have given birth. Women considering using LARCs should obtain contraceptive counseling from reproductive health professionals because those who do are more satisfied with them and use them for longer periods of time.

What are LARC methods?

Available LARC methods include IUDs and the subdermal implant:

  • Hormonal intrauterine device -Mirena and Liletta
  • Nonhormonal intrauterine device with copper - ParaGard
  • Subdermal contraceptive implant Nexplanon

Some shorter-acting methods are sometimes considered LARC:

  • Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection- Depo Provera shot

Prevention

I am having sex for the first time. How can I protect myself from pregnancy and STI?

  • It is an excellent idea for both parties to be screened for HIV and other infections that can be present without signs or symptoms. Have a discussion with your partner about which birth control method(s) will be good for both of you. Male and female condoms are good protection from both pregnancy and infections. Having Emergency Contraception Pills (ECP) on hand as a backup method is also good planning.

Is the withdrawal method a reliable way to prevent pregnancy and STI?

  • The withdrawal method, also referred to as pulling out, occurs when the man pulls his penis out before he ejaculates. If there is any pre-ejaculatory fluid on his penis, then there is a chance that a pregnancy may occur. It is not a reliable way to prevent pregnancy or prevent the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV.